Fantastically Disturbing Implications

This is more musing on my part than an educational – or ranting – essay.   Fantasy, as a genre, has become a tree of many different sub-genres and trends – all sprouting, according to most, from Tolkien’s magnum opus. Tolkien, however, based his work heavily on myths, epics, and sagas of real world cultures. …

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Contrast, Foreshadowing, Mood, Ice and Fire

Something that’s been driving me nuts in the A Song of Ice and Fire fandom lately is all the jokes about how George R.R. Martin includes so many food descriptions because he is fat. Somehow, fans have convinced themselves that those two things go together – because “obviously” writers who aren’t stick figures can’t possibly …

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Fantasy IS Fantastic, Thanks, And Doesn’t Deserve Scorn

Last, um, week? …We’ll go with week. Last week I talked about why it is completely inappropriate and fallacious to use the language of facts when talking about interpretations of a work (the only facts about a work are what the work literally says and what the author says about it, and thus those are …

Continue reading Fantasy IS Fantastic, Thanks, And Doesn’t Deserve Scorn

Fantasy IS Fantastic, Thanks, And Needs No “Secretly Sci-Fi” Justification

I’ve been thinking for a while about how better to explain what I talked about (the difference between meaning and interpretation and why saying “the author meant” is not acceptable when the author has said otherwise) in the Death of the Author post without causing myself further blood pressure problems. It occurred to me that …

Continue reading Fantasy IS Fantastic, Thanks, And Needs No “Secretly Sci-Fi” Justification